kazbahkidz said: What is your opinion on white girls with box braids?

tiffbiff-the5th:

blacksilk-gothmodel:

theblackpastellife:

It took me a few days to answer this because at first, I was so set to just reply to this with a bunch of reaction images but then I decided that I’ll take your bait (because that’s what this question is. bait) and I figured, why not. 

My opinion is that when white girls wear any hairstyle that is easily and traditionally identifiable with, naturally achieved and/or created by POC they usually do so with such ignorant and disrespectful disregard to the people who originated the fashion.

My opinion is that when white girls wear box braids, they do it for attention because they know, either consciously or subconsciously, that their skin color will grant them the privilege of being excused and revered for their appropriation.

My opinion is that when white girls wear box braids they further the dehumanizing and racist notion that Black hair is “bad, nasty and dirty” because they then turn around and complain about how “dirty” and “damaging” the styles are because they couldn’t wash their hair (for fear the braids unraveling or slipping out), or because their fell out or broke off (because their hair isn’t strong enough to hold the extensions properly), not realizing that the styles in question are not for them and never have nor will be (specifically due to their race and subsequently their hair texture) which is why they experience such extreme consequences.

My opinion is that when white girls wear box braids (and “locs” and twists, afros, et al), they do it to be “different” not realizing that in their quest for uniqueness, they are contributing to generations of oppression and dehumanization geared towards Women of Color.

By this I mean that Women of Color have been ridiculed, physically harassed and assaulted and even severely punished (jail or death) for simply wearing hairstyles that are traditional to our cultures. Women of Color, and more specifically Black Women of Color have had laws passed against our hair and hairstyles, laws that are still in effect today. Laws that are still being made today. (btw I’m not going to link any documentation of this because if you truly are interested you’ll figure out the next steps to enlightenment. )

So when a white girl, in her entitled and childish bigotry, attempts to force herself into and co-opt a movement and tradition that she has no place in, when she attempts to sloppily recreate the glory that we Women of Color naturally possess and she is then exalted as an originator of creative fashion while the very same Black Woman of Color is degraded as being ghetto or tacky for the very same hairstyle (which, to reiterate, she created), that white girl is benefiting from and adding to a society rife with misogynoir, racism, white privilege and, at the end of the very long rope, the effects of European colonialism.

My opinion is that when the general consensus from Women of Color is that white girls should refrain from bastardizing our style, traditions and culture, and that white girls should instead focus on their own unique beauty and try to contribute some slither of creativity to the fashion sphere by creating something unique to them and their only-important-when-refuting-their-whiteness cultures and traditions, white girls should listen and choose a different hairstyle that isn’t offensive, blatant appropriation and oppressive. 

And lastly my opinion when white girls wear box braids (or “locs”, afros or twists), 

image

This “cultural appropriation” crap seems endless. No one race owns anything. >_>

do you know what the word means or nah? do you understand what the ramifications of cultural appropriation are or nah? have you contemplated the drive behind and the entitlement to the cultures of POC or nah?

have you actually been living in the world and witnessing how cultural appropriation devalues and erases whole nations and cultures of people or have you just been coasting through life with your rose colored glasses on?

do you really believe that the anger towards the double standard imposed on Women of Color in relation to white women when it comes to our styles and standards of beauty and that our protectiveness of our culture is for naught or are you not at the bridge yet?

allofthefeelings:

Every time I see the quote about Marvel having “a lot on its plate” and that’s why we don’t have a movie with a female lead, I’m just like

image

I fucking love mashed potatoes, you guys.

But as much as I would happily eat them with every meal, sometimes I would like additional things on my plate.

chickenyaoi:

USA is some fucked up dystopian shit honestly like how are y’all even surviving?

Paying for healthcare? $60,000 on tuition? POC getting shot in Wal-Marts? White men shooting up elementary schools?

That’s terrifying I’m worried about all of you

dailyoddcompliment:

"Mini Tantrum"

dailyoddcompliment:

"Mini Tantrum"

“This is how thoroughly we women have been sexualized, that we cannot make the kind of noises that come with physical exertion without it being associated with sex. In fact, everything about our bodies has been sexualized in one way or another. If we groan during sport or we breast-feed in public, we are criticized for making people think about sex. If we talk openly about things like menstruation and poop and farts, then we are criticized for making people not want to think about sex.

Think about what it means to be ladylike and all of the adjectives that go along with it: elegant, cultured, classy, sophisticated. To be successful at being feminine means being successful at being private, keeping your body’s natural functions behind closed doors and never letting anyone know they exist. It means to be constrained, that you do not let your legs spread wide in public transportation and you do not make noises that are harsh on the ears. It means presenting a polished, shiny surface to the world at all times, one that allows others to project whatever they wish onto you while never showing too much of your true self.”

themouseabides:

Knowledge is knowing that Frankenstein is not the monster.

Wisdom is knowing that Frankenstein is the monster.

ziamgasm:

I just want all of you to know that if you ever need someone to talk to or have something on your mind please do not hesitate to send me an ask or something I don’t want any of you to feel like you’re alone you’re all such amazing people, you deserve all the happiness in the world and I fucking love all of you

(Source: cppija)

kohwala:

i even procrastinate sleep

ofgeography:

robin williams died today.
here is a list of things that robin williams was:
funny
sharp
kind
clever
and sad.
that’s important, the “and sad,” because sometimes sadness can feel like the only thing we are. it can feel all-encompassing. it can feel like the only thing anyone could possibly see, when they look at you: sad. that person is so, so, sad.
but there is always an “and.” we are never just sad. we are never only. we are always and.
we have all known people who were sad, who are sad; some of us are ourselves sad. being sad does not remove the other parts of us, though it can make them harder for us to see. when you are sad, you don’t necessarily feel like you are also funny, and sharp, and clever, and kind.
but you still are. you don’t have to feel like something to be it.
those things are written on your bones, they are woven into the fabric of your skin. sadness can feel so big, so big and overwhelming and complete, even when it is not a directed sadness. maybe especially when it is not a directed sadness, when it’s a depression that has no direct cause and nothing we can name.
sometimes the sadness is too big. people try to cut it out, or starve it out, or drink it down, or drug it silent. if this is you: i’m sorry. if this is you: you are not alone. if this is you: remember that the solution is never to give up, because you do not live in a vacuum. there are people waiting for you. there are films and songs and books and not-sadness waiting for you. i know that you don’t feel like waiting, but wait anyway.
if you need help, ask for it. here’s a link to crisis centers across the globe. if you live in the U.S., this is the national suicide prevention hotline: 1-800-273-8255.
robin williams died today, but the genie didn’t, and mrs. doubtfire didn’t, and peter pan didn’t. sean maquite didn’t, and professor philip brainard didn’t, and alan parrish didn’t. batty koda didn’t. john keating didn’t. you didn’t. 
don’t.

ofgeography:

robin williams died today.

here is a list of things that robin williams was:

  • funny
  • sharp
  • kind
  • clever
  • and sad.

that’s important, the “and sad,” because sometimes sadness can feel like the only thing we are. it can feel all-encompassing. it can feel like the only thing anyone could possibly see, when they look at you: sad. that person is so, so, sad.

but there is always an “and.” we are never just sad. we are never only. we are always and.

we have all known people who were sad, who are sad; some of us are ourselves sad. being sad does not remove the other parts of us, though it can make them harder for us to see. when you are sad, you don’t necessarily feel like you are also funny, and sharp, and clever, and kind.

but you still are. you don’t have to feel like something to be it.

those things are written on your bones, they are woven into the fabric of your skin. sadness can feel so big, so big and overwhelming and complete, even when it is not a directed sadness. maybe especially when it is not a directed sadness, when it’s a depression that has no direct cause and nothing we can name.

sometimes the sadness is too big. people try to cut it out, or starve it out, or drink it down, or drug it silent. if this is you: i’m sorry. if this is you: you are not alone. if this is you: remember that the solution is never to give up, because you do not live in a vacuum. there are people waiting for you. there are films and songs and books and not-sadness waiting for you. i know that you don’t feel like waiting, but wait anyway.

if you need help, ask for it. here’s a link to crisis centers across the globe. if you live in the U.S., this is the national suicide prevention hotline: 1-800-273-8255.

robin williams died today, but the genie didn’t, and mrs. doubtfire didn’t, and peter pan didn’t. sean maquite didn’t, and professor philip brainard didn’t, and alan parrish didn’t. batty koda didn’t. john keating didn’t. you didn’t. 

don’t.

(Source: bloodydifficult)

belfours:

fuck depression. there’s nothing more insidious than a disorder that tricks lovely people into believing they are worthless. 

(Source: m9dano)

asofteravenger:

not every verb has to be transitive.

asofteravenger:

not every verb has to be transitive.

h0odrich:

I also love how girls start shit talking off like ‘okay so Nicole like I love her, I adore her, she’s great and awesome and beautiful but like….’

“I used to think the worst thing in life was to end up all alone. It’s not. The worst thing in life is to end up with people who make you feel all alone.”
Robin Williams  (via blue811)

(Source: wordsnquotes)